New Anthology

I am pleased as punch to announce that my story, “The Raven’s Venture,” for which I won an Honorable Mention from the Writers of the Future contest, will be published in an upcoming anthology called Shards: A Noblebright Fantasy Anthology on October 1st from all major retailers (links below).

Shards cover

Ooh! Lovely cover, right?

Noblebright, if you’re wondering, refers to a newer subgenre of fantasy with an emphasis on the heroic and the hopeful. As far as I know, the term was popularized by the editor of this anthology, C. J. Brightley. While I am unfamiliar with many of the works in this subgenre, heroic characters are deeply important to me as both a writer and a reader, so I was intrigued with the premise of noblebright when I first discovered it.

How I found out about this anthology is a bit ironic. On Facebook, one of the writing-related groups I follow is called Grimdark Fiction Readers & Writers, which a writer friend had recommended to me because of our mutual interest in Steven Erikson’s Malazan series. That said, I skew more on the “reader” side of that spectrum than “writer,” as my work isn’t grimdark. Often violent, dark, and scary, yes, but there’s always someone there to fight against the bad things that the world throws at them. And no matter how much they want to, they never give up.

Obviously, grimdark and noblebright are polar opposites in terms of the character and theme, and in many ways reflect a fundamentally different worldview. I can’t imagine there being a lot of crossover between the strongest adherents of each. So if a diehard grimdarker shares a call for submissions for a noblebright anthology, you can bet its with more than a little tongue-in-cheek.

Original poster’s derision aside, I realized I had a perfect story looking for a home and the Shards anthology looked like a nice, cozy home. I’m glad the editor felt the same way.

I hope you’ll check it out when it’s released, and please remember to leave a review! Those go a long way in increasing visibility for authors and their books. Thanks!

Finds Shards on:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Smashwords

Kobo

iTunes

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Release the Dragons

Today marks the release of Dragon Writers: An Anthology! It features stories by loads of new and established authors, so there’s something (a whole lot of somethings, in my opinion!) for everyone in it. Aside from those of the Big Names of course, I’ve read stories by several of the other authors in the book, and they are all quite talented.

In my story “Manifest,” Torra is an old artisan who has lost the use of his hands. However, dragons have within them the power of creation, and Torra is able to use dragon magic to continue crafting amazing works in spite of his infirmity. But when tragedy strikes, Torra must discover the terrible cost of dragon magic and decide whether or not it’s worth using.

Check it out, and please tell others what you think by writing a review of the book!

You can also purchase the anthology in paperback.

To Indie or Not to Indie

As I mentioned in a previous post, a story I had written, called Scrapyard Paradise, had been accepted in an anthology called A Game of Horns: A Red Unicorn Anthology, published by WordFire Press (you can buy it here and elsewhere). Getting that acceptance email was easily one of the highlights of my burgeoning career as a writer. Another was getting this:

A Game of Horns

One in the hand is worth two in the ereader.

Now, I’m a big fan of ebooks. I’ve got a Kindle and a Kindle Fire, and I often read books on my phone. And having moved around the world, I had to part ways with my large collection of paper books. I think electronic books are the future of reading, and paper books will eventually go the way of the candle. Good for decorating your house, but not as useful as its more technologically-advanced counterpart.

But damn, does it feel good to hold my book in my hands.

I’ve published my own ebooks before, and every time I did, I felt satisfied and proud of the hard work I had done. But none of that came even close to getting this professionally-produced and published book in the mail, seeing its gorgeous cover, feeling the heft of it in my hands. I could never make anything as wonderful as this.

The moment I realized that, I knew what I would do with the Farshores Saga, something I hadn’t yet attempted (with the exception of Scrapyard Paradise): I would seek out a traditional publisher.

Although I’m not entirely satisfied with the Fourth World series (what kind of author would I be if I were satisfied with something I had written?), much of the feedback I received about it was positive. I thought the stories were pretty decent, if a bit unconventional and overly ambitious. Even so, they never really generated buzz or took off by any stretch of the imagination. Part of the reason could be that I never spent the money to give them the professional treatment they needed. I tried too hard to do everything myself instead outsourcing to people who knew how best to publish a book. Another part, and perhaps the more significant part, is that if I didn’t go out there and generate buzz about the books myself, no one would. And I didn’t.

A lot of traditionally published authors say they work just as hard to promote their books as any indie-published author. And that may be true, especially for the more successful ones. But it’s undeniable that simply having a publisher in your corner, someone who was willing to take a chance on you, is itself a promotion of your work. Some of my friends who had never read my Fourth World stories picked up a copy of the anthology simply because they knew it was traditionally published. I think there’s a lesson in there, and it’s that traditional publishing is the way to go for me.

Of course, one does not simply will a publishing contract into existence. You need to have a product that the publisher wants, and you have to show them why it’s in their interest to publish it. My writing group is a phenomenal group of people who, when they combine their powers, are like the Voltron of polishing a manuscript. With their excellent feedback, I’ve been able to take my novel to a much higher level. I’m confident that when it’s finished, it will be ready for the big leagues.

Plus, with Scrapyard Paradise, I’ve shown that going this route is not as far-fetched as I once thought. I know it’s achievable because, in the case of my short story, I’ve already achieved it. Now it’s just a matter of doing the best work I can to make it happen with my novel too. And honestly, while I liked Scrapyard Paradise as a story, Shoreseeker is at least fifty bajillion times better.

But the question of going indie or not is actually a false dilemma. An idea that I had toyed with when I was just starting out with the Fourth World was a hybrid approach to publishing: traditionally publishing some things, independently publishing others. A lot of authors have tried this approach with success, and I think especially given my own inclinations as a writer, this is the best way for me. So I will traditionally publish my novels.

As for independently published stuff? Well, that’s where Super Secret Project B comes in.

A Gift

With everything that’s going on in the news, all the tragedy and hate and violence, it’s sometimes easy to forget just how amazing our world is. One of the great things about holidays like Christmas is that it reminds us of this, that there are still good people in the world and that they, in fact, outnumber the bad by a large margin. It also reminds just how much progress we’ve made in terms of technology, too.

I was reminded of this just this morning. One of my favorite digital media distribution companies (all hail the Bezos) had its Christmastime $5 digital album download bonanza, of which I gladly partook. My tastes in music tend to run a little obscure, so for a long time I was always looking for CDs at the local record shops, hoping against hope that something that they would carry the latest album by whatever European band had caught my fancy recently. Then, there wasn’t too much hope of that. Just enough to whet my appetite and make me realize just how much I was missing.

I didn’t have too long to wait for the Internet to catch up, and many of the albums I was looking for could be bought online for a reasonable price. Then digital distribution became a worldwide phenomenon, where even independent bands from other countries could join in on the fun.

Now I tend to take this for granted, waiting impatiently for the latest DragonForce album’s price to drop (which it did, thank you very much). But I’m glad I live in a world where I can take this for granted, because hoping that I can buy that latest album is one more frustration I don’t have to deal with anymore. I know I can get it instantly with nothing more than the click of a button, and I can even wait for a lower price if I want to.

Of course, my other favorite form of digital media is the ebook. Prices tend to fluctuate even more with ebooks and I watch those prices even more closely than I do music. A lot of good ebooks are on sale right now, and I almost wish I could buy them again, they’re so cheap.

Clans cover finalAnd for the rest of the year only, I’ve made The Clans: Tales of the Fourth World, free on Smashwords. If you’ve been watching and waiting for this as eagerly as I do for other books, now is your chance. I’m not sure if other sites will pricematch that in such a short window, so Smashwords is your best bet, especially since it supports every major ebook format. I wish you all a Merry Christmas, and hope you all have an amazing new year.

Spear Mother Sighting on Smashwords

Multiple sightings of the mysterious Spear Mother on the Smashwords publishing platform have been reported. While these claims have not been substantiated, information about the sightings has been leaked at the following web address:

Spear Mother: A Tale of the Fourth World at Smashwords

We advise you proceed with caution as the entity known as Spear Mother has been known to cause heightened emotions, increased brain activity, and (in outlying cases) titillation. You have been warned.

If the claim of the Spear Mother’s presence on Smashwords proves true, it provides incontrovertible evidence that the Spear Mothers are multiplying. The nation’s leading scientists have already issued a statement saying that this could lead to more sightings of the fabled being at Barnes and Noble, iTunes, Kobo, and other ebook retailers. Details of the timeline of such events are forthcoming, though one of the scientists who issued the statement (name withheld by request) said the effects would certainly be devastating.

“I can’t believe these Spear Mothers are running wild, completely unchecked,” he or she said off the record. “First Amazon, and now this? We’re looking at the beginning of a pandemic. I fear for the future of the human race. I really do.”

After the release of the statement, we reached out to the other scientists involved, but have received no response as of the time of publication. Local authorities have declared them all missing persons, and are currently operating under the assumption that the Spear Mother(s) have sought the scientists out and challenged each of them to one-armed arena combat deathmatches. At this point no bodies have been found, but funeral services will be held for them anyway at St. James Memorial Cemetery in Newdirk, New Jersey this Saturday afternoon.

New Release: Spear Mother

Cover art for the new release, Spear Mother.

Cover art for the new release, Spear Mother.

I am pleased to announce that Spear Mother, a new 24K-word novella, has been released for Kindle! I apologize that it has taken this long to release, and would like to thank everyone for their patience. I hope that, after reading it, you will feel that your patience has been rewarded. Although everything I have written is special to me (especially when it’s what I’ve written most recently), this one is particularly so. Evoking an emotion is one of the most critical and fundamental tasks of any art, and literature is no exception. While I’ve never been one to shy away from powerful emotions by any measure, with Spear Mother I had a specific goal in mind – to create a story that evokes deeper, more powerful emotions than anything else I’ve written. I feel I have succeeded, though I’d love to know your thoughts in the comment section (or, even better, please write a review on Amazon!).

In other news, I have moved back to Japan. There are many reasons for this, not least of which being Japan is just an awesome country, but there was a writing-related motive as well. One of the reasons I love epic fantasy is its incredibly broad scope, geographical as well as historical. Living in the most modern country in the world, one with a history that only went back a few hundred years, couldn’t really serve as a model for the timeless worlds that I like to create. America is a very young place compared to much of the world. And as much as I love books, I don’t use them to research cultures very often since it often seems so fruitless – I’m more concerned about the tiny details of how people lived than with the abstract and broad sweep of events that fill most historical books. That’s what I really want to know about, so I opted for a more hands-on approach. Thus I decided to pick up and move halfway around the world.

It’s paying dividends. While Japan is a modern country, with skyscrapers and tech companies and giant robos, much of it is very rooted in the past, which sure is useful for someone who wants to immerse himself in a wildly different culture. It has me thinking about those tiny details that I love in the best fantasy stories, the ones that make you believe you are really there in the place that the author is describing. Those details have always seemed so elusive to me before, and honestly the best of them were borrowed from other people’s imaginations (a practice I am shamelessly fond of). Now I get to steal them from my own experiences. Woohoo!

You will likely see them in some form in the new project (The Fall of the Moon – working title) when it is released. Speaking of which, a lot of development has gone into that project of a form that is very uncharacteristic for me – outlining. Plotting has always meant having a few dots in mind, representing key aspects of the story, with the connecting of those dots being done in the act of writing. While I have done some outlining in the past, it has mostly been at the chapter/scene level. This time, however, I have outlined the last third of the book. I was so astonished with how useful that was that I may be inclined to do it again sometime. We will see.

Until next time.

Help Me Save the World…

… 99 cents per download on Dark Tree by making it free through Amazon. It’s easy, doesn’t cost you anything, only takes a couple minutes, and would be really awesome.

Want some undying gratitude from yours truly? Here’s how to get it. Click on the following link to go to Dark Tree‘s Amazon page:

Dark Tree on Amazon

Once there, scroll down to the section titled, “Product Details.” You should see something that says, “Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?” Click on the “tell us about a lower price” link.

A little window will pop up asking where you saw the lower price. Click on the radio button that says “Website (Online).” A URL bar will come up. Copy the following and paste it in that bar:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dark-tree-brandon-m-lindsay/1112440327?ean=2940044762299

For the price and shipping cost, type in “0.00” and hit “Submit Feedback.” That’s it. You’re done. Though if you want to, you can do the same again but with the following URL:

http://www.kobobooks.com/ebook/Dark-Tree-Tale-Fourth-World/book-wiwhKtkMzk-Cm_2CkUMejA/page1.html?s=J8avGdUgQEWud7pkOGo3qw&r=2

Then you can start collecting that undying gratitude I told you about.

Why do this? Why make a book free when I can charge for it? The short answer is: a free book is a much easier entry point for a reader who hasn’t heard about an author yet than a book that comes with a cost, even a minimal one. Dark Tree had done a pretty good job of drumming interest in its followup, The Clans (now available on Amazon), mainly because people were willing to take a chance on it due to the fact that it was free through most retailers.

However, I hadn’t quite anticipated just how well a free book could do on Amazon. Recently, The Clans had been made free on Amazon for two days. By the second day, it shot up to #20 in the bestselling free Epic Fantasy list, and #78 in the overall free Fantasy list. The number of downloads of The Clans during those two days destroyed Dark Tree‘s lifetime record. It even got a good number of downloads in the UK and Germany. That’s right – Germany. Who could have guessed?

I was astonished. While Dark Tree had been making strides up the rankings on other sites such as Barnes & Noble, it had been slow progress, and almost nonexistent when compared to The Clans’ rocket ride up the Kindle bestseller lists.

Now, part of this (maybe even a substantial part) had to do with the fact that The Clans is a full-sized book at over 100K, and Dark Tree is a novelette. Shorter fiction has always been a harder sell, and while that’s changing thanks to e-publishing, it’s still true that most people prefer longer works to shorter ones. So I don’t discount the length factor. Even so, I also can’t discount the fact that Amazon is still the 800-pound gorilla when it comes to selling ebooks. Other retailers are gaining market share, true, but for now Amazon is still the undisputed king.

Having a free ebook there would only be augmented by the fact that I also have a full-length follow-up book as well. Epic fantasy readers love their series, and they typically don’t like waiting around for the next installment in the series, so when it’s already out, they may be more likely to try it the first one. That’s what I’m hoping will happen with the Fourth World.

I believe that my plans for the series actually will work quite well in this regard. I will be releasing novels in series, starting with The Born Sword, in addition to smaller works which in between novels so that fans won’t have wait as long for new Fourth World books. Some of them will be free, just like Dark Tree.

However, the first step down this path starts with you, dear friends. By telling Amazon that Dark Tree can be bought for cheaper than what they’re selling it for, they will hopefully match the price. Once that happens, readers the world over will have free access to Dark Tree from their Kindles, phones, and computers.

Who knows? By doing this, you very well may save the world… 99 cents per download.