At Long Last

Finished Manuscript

After four years of finger cramps, brain cramps, and … uh, well, just those two kinds of cramps, I have in my hands a (nearly) finished version of my epic fantasy novel, Shoreseeker. Coming in at 174,000 words, it’s fairly long for a novel, but not so bad for epic fantasy.

I know what you’re thinking. Four years is a long time to write a novel, especially if that novel is part of a series. If we apply this same rate to the other four books in the Farshores Saga, we’re looking at sixteen more years until the series is complete, not including the year or two it takes to actually publish a book. That’s longer than it took to publish the first five books in A Song of Ice and Fire!

Of course, that’s not what I’m suggesting you expect. A lot goes into that first novel; once it’s done, much of the development work (world-building, character-building, etc.) is finished. Not only that, but I haven’t just been working on the first novel in the series. Here is everything Farshores-related I’ve done so far:

  • general series plot outline and worldbuilding
  • detailed book 2 outline, 2nd revision
  • 40,000 words of book 2, first draft
  • book 3 prologue and epilogue
  • book 5 prologue and final scene (no epilogue planned for that one)
  • detailed outlines for every game in the 5-game prequel RPG series
  • programming, design, and other development for the first game
  • rough outlines for 2 additional standalone non-RPG games

All of that took me four years. Not too bad, if I say so myself.

As you can see, I big chunk of work has already been done on book two, which I’m currently calling Drawingpath. This book has the advantage of being a more streamlined story, so once I go full-tilt on this one, it’ll take much less time than the first book did.

I’m beyond excited about what I have planned for the series in the future, but for now, Shoreseeker is where I’m focusing all my effort. After going through it from start to finish one last time and properly formatting it for submission, I’ll be tossing it out of the nest. Let’s hope it has wings.

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Release the Dragons

Today marks the release of Dragon Writers: An Anthology! It features stories by loads of new and established authors, so there’s something (a whole lot of somethings, in my opinion!) for everyone in it. Aside from those of the Big Names of course, I’ve read stories by several of the other authors in the book, and they are all quite talented.

In my story “Manifest,” Torra is an old artisan who has lost the use of his hands. However, dragons have within them the power of creation, and Torra is able to use dragon magic to continue crafting amazing works in spite of his infirmity. But when tragedy strikes, Torra must discover the terrible cost of dragon magic and decide whether or not it’s worth using.

Check it out, and please tell others what you think by writing a review of the book!

You can also purchase the anthology in paperback.

So What is Farshores, Anyway?

As I mentioned in my last post, the Farshores world encompasses much more than the just the events of a novel series. But let us focus on that for a moment first, and Shoreseeker in particular. Here is a description:

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Over six hundred years ago, a race of monsters called the sheggam swept across the world like a plague, killing everyone in their path. Mankind was driven to the brink of annihilation, and only found refuge behind a magical wall designed to repel the sheggam. Now, all that’s left of humanity is huddled behind Andrin’s Wall on a small peninsula called the Sutherlands.

Despite having faced extinction, humanity was able to rebuild. Grand cities were constructed, and the magical art of Patterning, nearly lost in the war with the sheggam, began to flourish again. The horrors of the sheggam scourge were far removed from the lives of ordinary citizens, and as the centuries passed, the dark memories of that time faded into myth.

At the time of the completion of Andrin’s Wall, a ripple in the world’s Pattern had caused a second barrier to be formed, called the Rift, which divided the Sutherlands in two: Naruvieth, a small city on the peninsula’s southern tip; and the many cities of the Accord in the north. All contact between the two lands had been severed almost from the beginning. Yet three years ago, a highway called the Runeway, created with magic once thought impossible, bridged the two lands, allowing contact between them for the first time in hundreds of years.

Not everyone is pleased with this, however. Tharadis, the Warden of Naruvieth, will do anything to stop the Runeway’s completion, even risk a war with all of the Accord. For, as humanity learned so long ago, there are worse things in the world than war. And all of them are poised on the other side of Andrin’s Wall.

*

So, what do you think? I know that if I had read this on the back of a book cover or in its product description, I wouldn’t hesitate to pick it up. I think that is every writer’s goal, to create fiction that he or she would enjoy reading. Shoreseeker is exactly the kind of book I would like to see more of, so I’m doing what I can to rectify this lack.

It’s hard to talk about the series without giving away too much about Shoreseeker, but one can only be too careful. It is an epic fantasy series, so you probably already know that the Sutherlands are too small to contain it. And what fantasy author would waste a big, scary world devastated by monsters? I, for one, wouldn’t.

While Shoreseeker starts in a more-or-less familiar epic fantasy world, the kind you could expect in a Robert Jordan or Terry Goodkind novel, it becomes horrific by the end. While fantasy has its dark worlds, such as anything that falls into the grimdark category, I haven’t come across any that are really that scary. One of my goals in this series is to create an epic fantasy that can give you nightmares.

But not because I think there is inherent value in giving people nightmares. I’d rather not have them myself. But one of the main reasons I’m writing this series is to give a home to the main character, Tharadis.

In a previous post, I mentioned that one of the reasons I write is to explore what makes us humans tick. A lot of dark fiction works do this, but they often examine how people break down in times of adversity. It’s fiction like this that gave rise to the idea of the anti-hero. This kind of fiction is almost always tragic, in the sense that even when the main characters get what they want, no one is really satisfied.

This kind of fiction is almost universally described as realistic, which is to say it accurately describes the human condition. “That’s the way the world works,” it implies. “Everything sucks, so you’d better get used to it.”

Perhaps it does end up that way for a lot of people. But it doesn’t have to.

Art can be powerful. It can be a light in the darkness. The world can be a cruel place; no one needs confirmation of that. But there is something that people often forget—goodness is real. And it can win. Sometimes we need art to remind of this. Personally, the books that I cherish the most are those that remind me of this simple yet profound truth.

So how does the world of Farshores, as relentlessly brutal as it often is, lead us to this idea?

Because some lights shine brightest in the darkest of nights.

Resolutions

Happy New Years, everyone! I know it’s been a while since I’ve posted any updates, and I’ve got a few that I’d like to share, so here goes.

First, and most important: my novel. I’ve been working on this beast for a while now, but life keeps getting in the way. It’s taken me a lot longer than I would have liked to get as far as I have, but the great news is I’m really far. Around 80%. So it’s no longer pie-in-the-sky. It’s pie-in-the-oven, and it’s starting to smell really good (from where I’m sitting in the kitchen. Okay, enough of the metaphor abuse). I intend, nay, resolve to finish this novel this year, including revision and editing.

Also, I’ve decided to change the title of the novel to Shoreseeker (let me know what you think in the comments). Previously, it was Fall of the Moon, but after heavily revising the worldbuilding and plot, that title no longer made a shred of sense, so I had to ditch it. Shoreseeker actually figures into the plot, the characters, the setting, and the theme. It doesn’t get any more perfect than that. The only concern I had about it was whether or not it would fit better on a book later in the series. In the end, I decided that it would be the title of book one.

Regarding the whole novel series, I have news on that as well. It will be called the Farshores Saga, and I plan it to be five books long (more on that in a later post). One of the main problems I had with the Fourth World series was I knew where I wanted to start, but I wasn’t all that sure where I wanted to end up. That was one of the reasons I abandoned that series (sorry to those who were hoping for more of the Fourth World – I don’t see that happening any time in the near future). I don’t have that problem at all with the Farshores Saga – quite the opposite. I’ve already had to shelve some really rad ideas because I don’t want the series to bloat up. Which is to say, I know where I’m going, from beginning to end. I’ve completely mapped out the main character’s arc for the whole series. I’ve already written some of the prologues and epilogues to later volumes (which helped me develop the overall direction of the series). I know how the final confrontation is going to play out, and I’ve even foreshadowed it a little in Shoreseeker.

I’ve learned my lesson from the Fourth World, so I guarantee I won’t run into the same kind of problems that I had with that series.

But with the Farshores Saga, I’m doing so much more than avoiding the things that plagued my last series. I’m creating something that I am truly passionate about, something that I truly believe in. The Fourth World, as the title implies, was an exploration of a particular kind of world, one with metaphysics that differed greatly from our own world: it was a universe where no one truly died, but merely went back and forth between different worlds. All of the stories in that series came from that one idea. As such, it wasn’t really about any particular characters and didn’t really capture any particular themes, other than that purely fantastical one.

That’s all well and good, but that’s not the kind of writer I am. While I certainly write in the fantasy genre, the things I want to see on the page after my fingers have hit the keys are themes about what it means to be human, to be alive. I am as passionate about these kinds of themes as I am about fantasy, and to see them melded together is what I hope to do.

Farshores is the manifestation of this dream.

As proud as I am of what I did with the Fourth World, I feel like that was just a stepping stone, something to get me ready for creating a story I can really pour myself into. I’m really excited to be able to share this with everyone, and I’m even more excited that it’s getting so close to completion.

In a later post, I’ll talk more about how I plan this series to be published, as well as Super Secret Project B, so stay tuned!

Spear Mother Sighting on Smashwords

Multiple sightings of the mysterious Spear Mother on the Smashwords publishing platform have been reported. While these claims have not been substantiated, information about the sightings has been leaked at the following web address:

Spear Mother: A Tale of the Fourth World at Smashwords

We advise you proceed with caution as the entity known as Spear Mother has been known to cause heightened emotions, increased brain activity, and (in outlying cases) titillation. You have been warned.

If the claim of the Spear Mother’s presence on Smashwords proves true, it provides incontrovertible evidence that the Spear Mothers are multiplying. The nation’s leading scientists have already issued a statement saying that this could lead to more sightings of the fabled being at Barnes and Noble, iTunes, Kobo, and other ebook retailers. Details of the timeline of such events are forthcoming, though one of the scientists who issued the statement (name withheld by request) said the effects would certainly be devastating.

“I can’t believe these Spear Mothers are running wild, completely unchecked,” he or she said off the record. “First Amazon, and now this? We’re looking at the beginning of a pandemic. I fear for the future of the human race. I really do.”

After the release of the statement, we reached out to the other scientists involved, but have received no response as of the time of publication. Local authorities have declared them all missing persons, and are currently operating under the assumption that the Spear Mother(s) have sought the scientists out and challenged each of them to one-armed arena combat deathmatches. At this point no bodies have been found, but funeral services will be held for them anyway at St. James Memorial Cemetery in Newdirk, New Jersey this Saturday afternoon.

New Release: Spear Mother

Cover art for the new release, Spear Mother.

Cover art for the new release, Spear Mother.

I am pleased to announce that Spear Mother, a new 24K-word novella, has been released for Kindle! I apologize that it has taken this long to release, and would like to thank everyone for their patience. I hope that, after reading it, you will feel that your patience has been rewarded. Although everything I have written is special to me (especially when it’s what I’ve written most recently), this one is particularly so. Evoking an emotion is one of the most critical and fundamental tasks of any art, and literature is no exception. While I’ve never been one to shy away from powerful emotions by any measure, with Spear Mother I had a specific goal in mind – to create a story that evokes deeper, more powerful emotions than anything else I’ve written. I feel I have succeeded, though I’d love to know your thoughts in the comment section (or, even better, please write a review on Amazon!).

In other news, I have moved back to Japan. There are many reasons for this, not least of which being Japan is just an awesome country, but there was a writing-related motive as well. One of the reasons I love epic fantasy is its incredibly broad scope, geographical as well as historical. Living in the most modern country in the world, one with a history that only went back a few hundred years, couldn’t really serve as a model for the timeless worlds that I like to create. America is a very young place compared to much of the world. And as much as I love books, I don’t use them to research cultures very often since it often seems so fruitless – I’m more concerned about the tiny details of how people lived than with the abstract and broad sweep of events that fill most historical books. That’s what I really want to know about, so I opted for a more hands-on approach. Thus I decided to pick up and move halfway around the world.

It’s paying dividends. While Japan is a modern country, with skyscrapers and tech companies and giant robos, much of it is very rooted in the past, which sure is useful for someone who wants to immerse himself in a wildly different culture. It has me thinking about those tiny details that I love in the best fantasy stories, the ones that make you believe you are really there in the place that the author is describing. Those details have always seemed so elusive to me before, and honestly the best of them were borrowed from other people’s imaginations (a practice I am shamelessly fond of). Now I get to steal them from my own experiences. Woohoo!

You will likely see them in some form in the new project (The Fall of the Moon – working title) when it is released. Speaking of which, a lot of development has gone into that project of a form that is very uncharacteristic for me – outlining. Plotting has always meant having a few dots in mind, representing key aspects of the story, with the connecting of those dots being done in the act of writing. While I have done some outlining in the past, it has mostly been at the chapter/scene level. This time, however, I have outlined the last third of the book. I was so astonished with how useful that was that I may be inclined to do it again sometime. We will see.

Until next time.