A (Temporary) Change of Direction

From the time when I was a tiny tot, I’ve been rather curious about how the world works. While other kids were busy playing soccer, I was going to garage sales to find chemistry sets and electronics kits. When other kids went with their friends to the beach, I would go trilobite hunting at a known, high-density fossil site, pickaxe firmly in hand, dewy eyes shining in the desert sun. The world was my playground, and discovery was the name of the game.

Fast-forward a couple decades, and I’m still playing the same game, but in a different playground: the worlds that I create for my fiction. I still want to know how everything works, and I’m not satisfied until I finally find the answers. My own worlds are no exception; the only difference is the rules of nature are determined solely by me. While world creation may sound a bit easier than figuring out the principles underlying the behavior of quantum particles (because you’re just making stuff up, right?), the process of discovery has a distinct advantage over that of creation: the rules of nature are already consistent with themselves. When one creates his own universe, however, such an expectation of consistency is not automatically assured.

The reason I bring that up is this: I have recently discovered that my own creation, namely that of the Fourth World, has some issues that need to be solved, particularly as it relates to The Born Sword.

Working in a fantasy world as strange as the Fourth World has its perks, but it has definitely worked my worldbuilding problem-solving muscles. There are certain philosophical questions that arise in such a bizarre universe, and while I get all frothy-at-the-mouth excited when it comes to questions like that, discovering the answers to such questions and then integrating them into a coherent story is a task that will simply take a little more time than I had originally expected.

If it sounds like I’m giving up on that novel, I want to assure you that I’m not. I want The Born Sword to be the best it can be, and that’s going to require some fixing. The reason I’m telling you this is because I have given you the expectation that it would coming soon, so very soon, but I would like to now temper that claim with some realism. I’m not one of those people who like to say that utopia is just around the corner, as long as you continue to demonstrate a little more patience. I prefer to tell it how it is.

Like any writer I’ve ever heard of, I’ve got quite a few stories in me, some of which are more suitable to setting and style different from the ones I’ve already written. As such, I’ve been working on another novel in a completely different world on the side for a while, and in light of the issues cropping up in the writing of The Born Sword, this new novel has recently become the main focus for my attention. It started out as merely something that kept me writing while I was working out the problems in The Born Sword, but has become something much, much greater. It is, I believe, going to be as good if not better than anything else I’ve written. I’m really, really excited about it. The working title of the new novel is The Fall of the Moon, but that will likely change as a result of a change in direction the story has undergone since I came up with the title.

One of the nice things about this new book is that I’ve specifically built in a resistance to the kinds of issues that I’m working on in the Fourth World. It, too, is epic fantasy, but with a stronger focus on plot, character, and theme, and not as much on a crazy magic system (though magic certainly plays a significant role) that creates more problems than it solves. Stay tuned for more details on this new book.

Of course, I am not abandoning the Fourth World at all, not even in the short run. In fact, I’ve got a completed story that, once I finish with the polishing-up stage (and once I have a title for it), will be ready for your consumption. It will follow the same distribution pattern as Dark Tree: free on this website, free on Smashwords and all of its affiliated platforms, and (once they decide to price-match) free on Amazon. I am in love with this story. I think it might be the best one taking place in the Fourth World yet, and for those of you who are interested in the nuts and bolts of how the Fourth World works, it will illuminate some of the more metaphysical (if not the more troublesome) aspects of the universe.

Speaking of which, I’ve created a lexicon of writings from the Fourth World regarding various aspects of its metaphysics some time ago. I’ve been trying to think of a good use for it, and I’ve decided that I will periodically post entries from the lexicon onto my Facebook Fan page. It was content in need of a home, and a page in need of content. A perfect marriage, if you ask me. If you’re interested in the more arcane aspects of the Fourth World, don’t hesitate to like the page here.

For those of you who love the Fourth World stories and were really hoping to see The Born Sword sooner rather than later, I hope that this upcoming Fourth World story will sate your desire for now. If it doesn’t, well… know that The Born Sword will likely be released before the next Rothfuss or Martin book. At least I can promise you that much *winks roguishly*. And who knows? I may even suddenly realize everything needed to finish it and, in a surge of inspiration, get it done before the other novel. Either way, I will keep you posted.

In other wonderful news, the brand new sister (brother?) review site to BestChickLit, called BestChapLit, posted reviews for Dark Tree and The Clans, as well as an interview with yours truly. If you’re looking to discover some good indie authors, I would definitely recommend checking out their sites.

Furthermore! The Clans is now only $0.99 from all distributors (Amazon, Apple, B&N, Kobo, etc.), so if you’ve been holding out because the economy’s got you down, now is your chance to read it without breaking the bank. Thanks for stopping by!

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News News News, and Thank-Yous

I’m pleased to announce several new developments. First of all, the combined 5-day free promotion for The Clans through Amazon was a resounding success, with several hundred copies downloaded worldwide in that short span of time. I was absolutely floored at the response; I know that a lot of those downloads came from readers of my blog, and also from people who heard about it from them. From the bottom of my heart, I thank you all for helping out with this. The success of that promotion is due in very large part to all of you, and I want you to know that I greatly appreciate it. My hope is that people who are looking for something a little different in the realm of epic fantasy find it in The Clans, and opportunities to spread the word like this are some of the best ways for this to happen.

Also, on that note, Dark Tree is now free on Amazon as a result of their price-matching policies—which, again, is thanks to all of you who helped out with the “Help Me Save the World” campaign I launched last month. This is huge, as it is likely that Dark Tree will stay free and thus will allow potential readers to become actual readers with no risk to their pocketbooks. I know that some of my readers became fans of the series due to trying out Dark Tree for free on sites like Smashwords, so having that available for free full-time on such a prominent site is incredible. Again, thank you to everyone who contributed in any way.

Speaking of Smashwords, The Clans is now available there. When I first released The Clans, I had wanted to try out Amazon’s KDP Select program, which provided perks like the 5-days-for-free promotion (which was great) as well as the Kindle Lending Library (which didn’t do a thing for The Clans). However, it came with the caveat that no other site could offer The Clans for at least 90 days, so anybody who bought their books from other sites weren’t able to read it unless they got their hands on a Kindle app (a problematic situation if you mainly read on your Nook).

I had heard a number of arguments for and against the program, and I knew that I would be taking a risk by participating in it, but I wanted to know one way or another if such a program could help get the word out for the Fourth World series. As I said earlier, the free promotion paid off, but it was at the expense of those who wanted to get the book from a different site. It was an interesting experiment, but I have determined that it would probably be better just to release future books to all sites and for all formats as soon as possible rather than allowing anyone to have exclusivity to it. After all, isn’t that what spreading the word is all about?

On the writing front, I’ve been plugging away at The Born Sword—which is shaping up quite nicely—as well as a couple of stories for a future Fourth World collection like The Clans. Also, thinking of the deep future for when the Fourth World series is complete, I have been toying with a few ideas for a new fantasy series. I’m getting pretty excited about it, but don’t worry. The Fourth World is still priority number one. *grins*

Well, that’s it for now. I hope everyone is having a wonderful holiday season! See you next year!